Wednesday, 6 February 2013

Socket to Me

'Richard III' by William Shakespeare
'Richard III' by William Shakespeare (Photo credit: Huntington Theatre Company)
Following the positive identification of Richard III, from bones discovered under a Leicester car park, I asked SW if she’d seen the facial reconstruction of the long lost king. She hadn’t, so I whisked her away to the computer and found the appropriate page on the BBC website.

SW was fascinated by the reconstruction, but her attention was drawn, again and again, to the skull. Well, I suppose we see people’s faces on a daily basis, and it’s easily understandable why the hinging of a lower mandible and the hollow places that accommodated the royal eyes and nose, were worth a second and third look.

Particularly intrigued by the teeth – SW has been busily growing her second set, these past months – it was noticeable how impressed she was by the majestic molars and imperial incisors. I suspect that a drawing may be imminent.
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11 comments:

  1. the discovery was also covered in our prime time news, although i admit i haven't heard of Richard III. i may have to do some research to learn about him.

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    1. It's a fascinating story, Odette.

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  2. I must admit it was the teeth that attracted my attention too, after all they'd have been the only bit left of him that would have been seen by others on a daily basis. If those teeth could speak eh? On second thoughts....

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    1. That's a good point you make about the teeth, Nell. I wonder how the one in the front went missing. Field of battle, during the excavation, or too much treacle sponge and custard?

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  3. What are the odds! I've been fascinated by this story and by the reconstruction done of the head. And next, the cloning!

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    1. Well, the DNA matching appears to prove beyond doubt. It's a great story, but there's already a squabble developing over where he should be re-buried. *sigh*

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  4. Interesting story. And he did have scoliosis. Isn't that what most of us want to know -- how far off the Bard's description was?

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    1. Yes, the scoliosis is there for all to see, Susan. As for his character, we'll probably never know. The Tudor 'spin doctors' did a good job on him.

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  5. skulls are fascinating I think :) and teeth even more so!

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    1. Yes, in a way, you say that Richard had the last laugh!

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  6. It's a fascinating story and I've enjoyed the resultant humorous spin-offs too. I do like your post title!

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