Friday, 1 February 2013

What's Your Name, Again?

It’s not unusual for prospective parents to spend countless hours agonising over the best name for baby. Unless you decide to stick a pin in the short-list, or let tradition dictate a ‘family’ name, you’re final decision may be influenced by any number of factors. Maybe it’s got be trendy, and when I say ‘trendy’, I probably mean traditional. Tom, Jack and Harry seem to have gained considerable ground on some of the more outlandish choices, Finbar, Tarquin, etc.

Some of us have ended up labelled after a relative stranger. In my case, I believe it was the vicar who baptised me. Others may be named on a whim, what might be termed, a sudden rush of brood to the head.

There’s no doubt about the celebrity effect, either. Kids called after football teams, pop stars and the like. Or even those poor little mites whose names carry the heavy weight of expectation. We named you well and, with that you will surely live up to it.

But for me, I’d like to give three cheers for Blaer. Never heard of her? Well, Blaer, which means ‘light breeze’, is an Icelandic girl that has just had her name recognised and approved by the authorities in her home country. Apparently, Blaer is considered a boy’s name and is not acceptable for a female. Hmm, I can imagine being called ‘hot air’, but ‘light breeze’, no. Too girly.
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12 comments:

  1. Oh yes, that's just splendid, being able to keep one's chosen name! :-)

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    1. When I read the article about Blaer, I was surprised to say the least. I'm glad she's no longer referred to as 'girl'.

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  2. I'd imagine, in Iceland, even a light breeze might be a force to be reckoned with. But in UK at present perhaps a name like 'Drizzella' (Drizzle for short, or even 'Drip' as a nickname) might need closer inspection? lol :)

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    1. Nice to hear from you, Jinksy. Where have you been hiding?

      Drizzella could catch on, along with flowella!

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  3. names that are ordinary in one country may seemed weird or hilarious in others. when i went to india, i find it difficult suppressing my laughter when i was introduced to "sukdeep"! blaer is a nice name for whatever gender.

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  4. I have a Japanese friend whose parents named her Lena but the name had to be registered as Rena as the Japanese don't accept the letter L. (This is not a joke -- this is what Lena told me.)

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    1. This whole business of acceptable names never really crossed my mind until I read the article. I can't imagine being in Lena's position and not having my name officially recognised.

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  5. Of Course,Names can have unintended consequences ..We named our son CHRISTOPHER & everybody assumed us very religious ..infact he was named after Chris Anderson the then Australian Rugby League coach at Halifax (he had recently taken them to winning cup final at Wembley)

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    1. An alternative meaning for the term, 'trying for a baby', Tony?

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  6. I'm so glad she won! I like the name "Blaer" too. I remember as a girl finding a yellowed sheet of paper in a book in our family home. On it were written about five girl's names, with mine (Christine) being in second place after Kate. This was intriguing to me - imagine being called Kate! Why had they chosen Christine? Was the list in order of preference or not? I went to my father, without disclosing I'd found the list, and quizzed him a bit. What would you have named me if you hadn't decided on Christine? Answer: no idea. What would you have named me if I'd been a boy? Answer, not missing a beat: Jesus Christ.

    That still makes me laugh!

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  7. Some names are just too silly, even unfortunate. I know the poor kids can change them when they grow up but carrying a ridiculous name around could surely be an embarrassment.

    Blaer is pleasant, though.

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